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Home » Careers » Career Path @ PepsiCo

career path @ pepsico

Our people are our greatest strength. Without a broad base of talented people, we cannot continue to deliver exceptional results. Our goals are to attract, hire, train & retain the most talented people. By valuing our employees, supporting their ability to work effectively together and providing them with the tools they need to succeed, we are ensuring that pepsico australia & new zealand is the kind of company where talented people of all backgrounds want to work.

Demonstrating consistent and superior results is essential for you to be considered for future job opportunities. We take a long-term view of performance against Business and People Results. Consistency is important. It's unlikely that one success will make your career, or that one failure will end it. We're looking for a track record of sustained successes rather than unpredictable highs and lows. This does not mean achieving results at any cost. We value results that are based on trust, respect, fairness and teamwork and results that create a lasting impact. That means an employee should remain in an assignment long enough to make his or her contributions clear.

"People Results" are a significant part of our performance expectations. Managers need to be able to attract, retain and develop the very best talent. Our 360-degree feedback and Organizational Health processes tell us how well we're doing. The People Results rating in our Performance Management Process (PMP) reflects the importance we place on people management, team work and self-development.

To succeed in the marketplace we need strong leaders. That's why we have enhanced our Leadership Competencies to reflect the needs of the "new PepsiCo". While we kept the familiar framework with the same three overall imperatives (Setting the Agenda, Taking Others with You, and Doing It the Right Way), we have expanded the list of competencies that drive success in PepsiCo. We've also added more detailed descriptions of behaviors that demonstrate mastery of each competency. These leadership competencies form the foundation for our 360-feedback.

They also provide an important reference for measuring People Results (along with other indicators such as bench strength, inclusion and retention) on a consistent basis across PepsiCo. Most importantly they give us a framework to determine an executive's contribution as a leader over several years.

When we coach an executive on his/her leadership skills, we can consider such questions as:

  • Has this individual demonstrated a particular leadership competency consistently?
  • How has his or her leadership effectiveness grown over several years?
  • Has this individual improved his or her impact on the organization?
  • Has he or she created an inclusive work environment?
  • Which employees has this person developed?
  • What has been the level of turnover in his or her group?
  • Does this person have the skills to take on a more significant leadership position?

Leadership capability increases in importance as you move to more senior roles. Entry-level managers, for example, should be more focused on Doing it the Right Way than on Setting the Agenda or Taking Others with You. As you move to middle manager and senior leadership roles, however, having strengths in all of these areas becomes increasingly important. At more senior levels we value leaders who can set the agenda and drive innovation. Although innovation often involves taking risks, and it's important that those risks are well considered and aligned with the business, we recognize that not every risk will pay off. Sometimes we learn a great deal about an individual's leadership capabilities from the way in which he/she overcomes setbacks or deals with difficult situations.

Personal and career growth requires deep functional skills. If you're a sales manager, you should have an intimate understanding of the sales process and how to drive sales growth. If your field is finance, you should have a strong command of the technical elements. The PepsiCo Chairman's Award is one way in which we honor and reward those individuals and teams who have distinguished themselves as truly extraordinary and serve as an inspiration to all of us. We expect every one of our employees and managers to be committed to building their functional expertise, whatever it may be. Functional excellence can be built in many different ways. Some divisions use functional competency models while others use more informal experience. Whatever the approach, functional excellence is ultimately built by gathering experience in different areas and roles over time.

Once an individual reaches a certain level or position in the organization (e.g., Band III), and functional excellence has been well demonstrated, the basis for getting bigger and better jobs shifts to other areas such as leadership capability or key experiences.

Just as we expect employees to develop expertise in a given functional area, it is critically important that managers develop a broader knowledge of how we make, sell and deliver our products. We expect all of our managers to seek out opportunities and experiences that will enhance their understanding of our markets and front-line work. Managers who more fully understand what drives our businesses will make better business decisions. In order to move into more senior roles, you need to demonstrate a combination of strong functional skills and broad business understanding.

Discussions about an individual’s potential career moves include an assessment of his or her experiences and the types of new experiences needed for further career development. Certain jobs and roles require a specific set of prior experiences. It is difficult to imagine selection a Vice President of Sales, for example, who has not had some front line experience at some point in his or her career.

In our rapidly changing environment, you run the risk of limiting your career potential if you devote all of your effort to qualifying for one particular job. That job might not exist by the time you're ready. Or the job requirements may have changed. You can prepare yourself for the future, however, by testing yourself in a range of different environments and challenges. To take advantage of these opportunities, you need to e flexible. Being open to various opportunities and situations is the best way to develop a set of career building experiences. This means seeking out opportunities to demonstrate that you can handle change and adapt successfully to different situations and challenges.

Task forces, special projects, short-term assignments and other opportunities all contribute to an employee's depth of experiences and build his or her capability. The sequence of experiences is often not critical, although building a hip-pocket skill early in your career is important for future development. More importantly, you should seek out new experiences that are challenging and contribute to your overall growth.

Building relationships with others throughout the organization (e.g., functionally, cross-functionally, and cross-divisionally) is also part of this process. It provides you with new insights and exposure to other talented people. Learning first-hand about the challenges they have faced increases your in-depth knowledge of the organization.

If employees accept responsibility for building their skills and experiences, the Company in turn needs to provide employees with the appropriate opportunities. Managers are accountable for providing employees with opportunities to grow in line with their results, capabilities and career aspirations.

While one cannot predict the timing of specific opportunities, there are some guidelines to consider, both for coaching your direct-reports and building your own career:

  • Think about experiences that would stretch you the most.
  • Be flexible -- the more flexible you can be, the wider the range of opportunities will be available to you.
  • Be patient -- don't put pressure on yourself by imposing unrealistic expectations on titles or timing.
  • Remember that a career is a long-term journey -- don't move just for the sake of moving. Make sure that any opportunity is consistent with your personal goals and gives you the opportunity to learn or demonstrate something new.
  • Build for the long term. An in-band move might be the best investment you can make for your long-term goals. It's unlikely that every move you make will be to a new band.

Proven Results.

Demonstrating consistent and superior results is essential for you to be considered for future job opportunities. We take a long-term view of performance against Business and People Results. Consistency is important. It's unlikely that one success will make your career, or that one failure will end it. We're looking for a track record of sustained successes rather than unpredictable highs and lows. This does not mean achieving results at any cost. We value results that are based on trust, respect, fairness and teamwork and results that create a lasting impact. That means an employee should remain in an assignment long enough to make his or her contributions clear.

"People Results" are a significant part of our performance expectations. Managers need to be able to attract, retain and develop the very best talent. Our 360-degree feedback and Organizational Health processes tell us how well we're doing. The People Results rating in our Performance Management Process (PMP) reflects the importance we place on people management, team work and self-development.